Logo
FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups  ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in
Guidelines on: Image Sizes & Resolutions

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.fanart-central.net Forum Index -> Reference & Policies
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Stratadrake
Grammar nazi
(and proud of it)


Joined: 05 May 2004
Posts: 13689
Location: Moo

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 8:51 am    Post subject: Guidelines on: Image Sizes & Resolutions Reply with quote

(Forum Shortcut: Type url:rules:size to produce a link to this topic.)


Denis recently expanded the information on our approval control panel allowing us to review the image resolution (width & height, measured in pixels) of each submission.

Since then, we have noticed that some FAC users like their submissions are big -- I mean really big. While the "standard" resolution for a computer monitor these days seems to have inflated from 640x480, to 800x600, to 1024x768; we've been seeing submissions which would dwarf the average computer monitor! We have seen images weighing in at 3,000 and 4,000 pixels wide being submitted to FAC, and as a member of the approval staff myself, when I'm doing approval work, my #1 most commonly-issued rejection reason has quickly become this:
Quote:
"Image too large, please resize."

In case some of you are wondering why: First and most importantly, large images do not break any rules. We feel that as a general rule you should be able to upload your work at whatever size you think is best for viewing it -- but there's a certain point beyond which we start to question whether the image really needs to be as large as you think it is, or if you are even paying attention to such matters in the first place.

Back in the early days of FAC, we used to regularly restrict submissions to approximately 600 pixels wide and no more than 300kb of filesize. The width limit was out of concern for users with smaller (640x480) desktop resolutions, and the filesize limit was out of concern for FAC server space. Now although those rules are history (FAC automatically creates resized versions for easy viewing), I'd like to point out a few common-sense things that all artists need to be aware of -- like I said earlier, you won't get in trouble if your image is huuuuge, but large images won't do you any favors, either.

So if you've received rejection notices because of image size, yes I am talking to you:

#1 - DPI. What is it? "Dots per inch", this little value translates how large a digital image (measured in pixels, or "dots") corresponds to its real-life dimensions (in inches). DPI is used in three contexts, but for uploading artwork to FAC, you only need to know about two:
  • Monitor DPI. Put a ruler up to your screen and count how many pixels there are between the 0 and 1 -inch marks on the ruler. The value you get is your monitor's approximate DPI. Most computer monitors tend to measure in at about 75 ~ 100 dpi, depending on the monitor's actual size and your current desktop resolution. Remember this value for later....

  • Scanner DPI. When you scan a drawing in off the paper, the scanner's resolution (also measured in DPI) controls the size of the image you get. Many scanners default to 150 dpi for scanning, but you can adjust the scanner's DPI setting smaller or larger to produce a smaller or larger image.

#2 - Why are DPI values important? For optimum viewing of your artwork, the image you upload should appear on-screen at approximately the same size as it actually is in real life. And in order to do this you need to have some idea of your monitor's DPI (my monitor shows approximately 80dpi, but that's just me) so you can set your scanner's DPI to match. If you don't, if you leave your scanner to capture your piece at its happy default of 150dpi (or, heaven forbid, 300dpi), you will get an image that appears very large ononscreen -- and yes, I mean positively HUGE.

Why is this a bad thing?
  • You should never upload a drawing that appears larger on-screen than it is in real life. Scanners are notorious for detecting little tiny flaws like paper grains, flecks of loose color shavings, creases, pencil lines which you thought had erased completely, fingerprints and smudges -- in other words, at a high resolution, the scanner is showing too much detail, and this drags down the quality of the image as a whole when you find out that your white paper doesn't look as smooth or white as you thought it was.

  • People should be able to view the entire, full-size image onscreen without needing to scroll around. This is why FAC automatically creates resized versions to show what the piece is. But when somebody clicks to view the piece in its original glory, what good is it going to do them if the piece is three or four times as large as their monitor and they can only see a tiny portion of it onscreen? Sometimes this is okay, such as for tutorials or comic strip panels where you are supposed to view it one section at a time, but for all other purposes, you need to be able to see all of the "big picture" (pun intended) at once.

  • Large images drain bandwidth. They take up a lot of data space and load slooow (even more so for dial-up users). Despite how efficient a JPG or PNG is at compressing image data, a huge image is still huge. We've seen some pieces in the 3,000x2,000 range being submitted to FAC, and at those dimensions, even a JPG will weigh in at nearly one entire megabyte apiece! An image in the range of 1024x768, meanwhile, may weigh in at a much lighter value, like 200kb.


#3 - Since you can't change your monitor's DPI value, the only way to get your image appearing onscreen at approximately "life size" is to scan or resize your piece to the same DPI as your monitor. Remember, the average computer monitor displays images in the range of 75~100 dpi, so if you tell your scanner to capture your drawing at 75 or 100 dpi from the get go, the image you get will appear at just the right size it should be. Don't try to get the DPI values spot on -- you can't, and it doesn't matter anyway. Just get your image a resolution that is close to its real-life size, and that's good enough.

If you don't know what DPI value your scanner is using, stop right here and go read your scanner's manual, check your scan utility's "Help" menu, or fetch someone who knows. Setting your scanner's DPI is part of your basic scanner know-how, you simply must know how to do it. No excuses.

Here's a tip: Most scanners on the market these days are designed for 8.5x11" sized paper. Scan an 8.5x11" sized drawing at various DPI settings, and this is approximately how large you can expect your image to be:
    50dpi = 600x400 pixels (a little smallish)
    75dpi = 800x600 pixels (just right!)
    100dpi = 1200x900 pixels (a little big, yes, but at least you don't have to scroll around much)
    150dpi = 1600x1200 pixels (too big!)
    300dpi = 3,200x2,400 pixels (WAY too big!!)
    600dpi = 6,500x5,000 (...do you even have to ask?)

#4 - Already scanned your drawing, and the image is too big? No problem! Just open up your image into whatever graphics program you use (Photoshop, GIMP, MS Paint, etc.) and tell it to resize your image to smaller dimensions. For example, if your scanner captured an image at 150dpi, then just open it up and resize the image down by half -- this will create an image measuring 75dpi (since half of 150 is 75), which is perfect for uploading to FAC.

#5 - And finally, if you need help on exactly how to resize a picture in a given program, we have basic instructions (for GIMP, PaintShop, Photoshop, and even MS Paint) available in our FAQ area, here:
- Resizing FAQ.
_________________
Strata here: Nanowrimo - FAC - dA - FA
Disclaimer: Posts may contain URLs. Click at your own risk.


Last edited by Stratadrake on Sun Oct 14, 2007 3:25 pm; edited 12 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
scanbomb
Oldbie


Joined: 08 Apr 2006
Posts: 2118
Location: Behind you.

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have done that with a couple of my pics because my scanner doesn't let me size my pics to a viewable level.
_________________
I am awaiting my approval for ARP Guild 1.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
KeheiZero
Elder In Training


Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 3537
Location: Scotland

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The fact is there's no excuse for not resizing. Even MS paint can do it.
_________________
"You know what? My squirrel instinct tells me he's even more of a bastard than I first thought." - Gene Hunt
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
scanbomb
Oldbie


Joined: 08 Apr 2006
Posts: 2118
Location: Behind you.

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 2:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My scanner won't let me.
_________________
I am awaiting my approval for ARP Guild 1.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
London
Moderator


Joined: 23 Mar 2006
Posts: 6474

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1. Your scanner probably can, you just don't know how to use it.
2. MS paint can resize. That has nothing to do with your scanner.
_________________
Go Yankees!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
unfocused
Moderator


Joined: 17 Jul 2004
Posts: 6981
Location: Texas

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 3:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your scanner has the DPI options. set it to 100dpi or lower, if possible. Images that are "too large" usually have been scanned at 300dpi or near there. I scan mine at most 200, then resize in a photo editor.
_________________
"edit : i luv james" - Layzcarter
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Stratadrake
Grammar nazi
(and proud of it)


Joined: 05 May 2004
Posts: 13689
Location: Moo

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

(ahem)

We have had a Resizing FAQ topic available for quite some time in the FAQ section.

Those who complain about "not knowing"....
    READ.

    LEARN.

Seriously guys, this is pretty basic stuff that every good artist has already mastered, so if it isn't second nature yet, you need to get working on it.
_________________
Strata here: Nanowrimo - FAC - dA - FA
Disclaimer: Posts may contain URLs. Click at your own risk.


Last edited by Stratadrake on Wed Jun 06, 2007 6:24 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
scanbomb
Oldbie


Joined: 08 Apr 2006
Posts: 2118
Location: Behind you.

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My scanner seriously doesn't have sizing options. All it does is scan. Color. Save.
_________________
I am awaiting my approval for ARP Guild 1.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Benk
Elder In Training


Joined: 28 Jul 2006
Posts: 3733

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 6:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

London wrote:
1. Your scanner probably can, you just don't know how to use it.
2. MS paint can resize. That has nothing to do with your scanner.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
scanbomb
Oldbie


Joined: 08 Apr 2006
Posts: 2118
Location: Behind you.

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I scan my pics then color them. Then save. That is all my scanner does.
_________________
I am awaiting my approval for ARP Guild 1.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
unfocused
Moderator


Joined: 17 Jul 2004
Posts: 6981
Location: Texas

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

wtf

forget about scanners

this has nothing to do with scanners

edit: scanbomb, click this link. it will probably help if you get a parent or older sibling to read and discuss this with you. http://forums.fanart-central.net/viewtopic.php?t=12984
_________________
"edit : i luv james" - Layzcarter


Last edited by unfocused on Sat May 12, 2007 7:19 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Benk
Elder In Training


Joined: 28 Jul 2006
Posts: 3733

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You color them using a digital art program, that digital art program can resize them
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
scanbomb
Oldbie


Joined: 08 Apr 2006
Posts: 2118
Location: Behind you.

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am smart enough to understand things now, don't worry. I won't need my parents.
_________________
I am awaiting my approval for ARP Guild 1.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
unfocused
Moderator


Joined: 17 Jul 2004
Posts: 6981
Location: Texas

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

we're not saying you aren't smart enough. But if it's this difficult for us to explain this to you, you can't hold it against us.
_________________
"edit : i luv james" - Layzcarter
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
scanbomb
Oldbie


Joined: 08 Apr 2006
Posts: 2118
Location: Behind you.

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know what to do now THX to stratadrake. I will just send my pic to MS paint and resize it there. THX for giving me the link.
_________________
I am awaiting my approval for ARP Guild 1.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Stratadrake
Grammar nazi
(and proud of it)


Joined: 05 May 2004
Posts: 13689
Location: Moo

PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2007 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Though it does kinda raise the question of, exactly how do you scan a drawing on your computer anyway? Exactly what steps do you follow.

Whenever I scan a drawing, I usually do it in these five, easy steps:

1- Start GIMP.
2- Start HP PrecisionScan Pro (standard scanning application for HP scanners)
- - Do a prescan (a quick 30dpi scan so you can see what it looks like and make adjustments)
- - Select what area of the scanner glass I'd like to scan. (Otherwise it scans the entire glass and I need to crop it later)
- - Adjust the exposure settings. (This alone can take up to 15 minutes to get it looking "just right")
- - Copy a final scan of it to the clipboard.
3- Paste the final scan into GIMP.
4- My sketchbook is actually too large for the scanner bed, so I end up having to orient the paper sideways and scan it in two halves, which involves even more steps:
- - Turn the paper 180ยบ to center on the other half.
- - Copy a second final scan to the Clipboard
- - Paste it into GIMP, on top of the previous can.
- - Align & rotate the two scans to match up.
- - Clean up the edges and merge the two scans to produce a single, final image.
5- Save the final scan to disk in GIMP.
_________________
Strata here: Nanowrimo - FAC - dA - FA
Disclaimer: Posts may contain URLs. Click at your own risk.


Last edited by Stratadrake on Sun May 13, 2007 9:38 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
scanbomb
Oldbie


Joined: 08 Apr 2006
Posts: 2118
Location: Behind you.

PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2007 9:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do this...

1. Preview Scan my image.

2. Scan my image

3. Color my image with MS paint

4. Erase any pencil marks.

5. Save it.


That is all I do.
_________________
I am awaiting my approval for ARP Guild 1.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Stratadrake
Grammar nazi
(and proud of it)


Joined: 05 May 2004
Posts: 13689
Location: Moo

PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2007 9:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
1. Preview Scan my image.

2. Scan my image


Okay, the step you seem to be missing is what belongs right between #1 and #2: Resolution (size), scan area, and exposure settings. That's what separates a power user from the rookie, whether you leave something on "auto" or fine-tune it for best results. Scanner can't do everything for ya, and the scan resolution is one value in particular that the program simply can't decide on its own.

So look around the menus in your scan utility (what is it called, by the way?) for any options that deal with "resolution".
_________________
Strata here: Nanowrimo - FAC - dA - FA
Disclaimer: Posts may contain URLs. Click at your own risk.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kittyshootingstar
Very bored


Joined: 19 Mar 2006
Posts: 174
Location: my computer

PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually tend to scan my pictures in pretty big when I'm going to color them on Photoshop. It's a little easier for me that way. But I always resize them to reasonable dimensions and file size before uploading them. It really burns me up when I ask someone to resize their 4000 pixel square image and they say they don't know how. I've begun to use the link to the resizing tutorial page Strata made so much, I literally have it memorized.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.fanart-central.net Forum Index -> Reference & Policies All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum